Lower Level and General Education Courses

The courses listed in this section are for informational purposes only; they are NOT offered at A&M-Central Texas.

General Education / Lower Level Courses - A

Accounting

ACCT 2301. Principles of Financial Accounting. 3 Semester Credit Hours.

This course is an introduction to the fundamental concepts of financial accounting as prescribed by U.S. generally accepted accounting principles (GAAP) as applied to transactions and events that affect business organizations. Students will examine the procedures and systems to accumulate, analyze, measure, and record financial transactions. Students will use recorded financial information to prepare a balance sheet, income statement, statement of cash flows, and statement of shareholders’ equity to communicate the business entity’s results of operations and financial position to users of financial information who are external to the company. Students will study the nature of assets, liabilities, and owners’ equity while learning to use reported financial information for purposes of making decisions about the company.

ACCT 2302. Principles of Managerial Accounting. 3 Semester Credit Hours.

This course is an introduction to the fundamental concepts of managerial accounting appropriate for all organizations. Students will study information from the entity's accounting system relevant to decisions made by internal managers, as distinguished from information relevant to users who are external to the company. The emphasis is on the identification and assignment of product costs, operational budgeting and planning, cost control, and management decision making. Topics include product costing methodologies, cost behavior, operational and capital budgeting, and performance evaluation.

Anthropology

ANTH 2351. Cultural Anthropology. 3 Semester Credit Hours.

The study of human cultures. Topics may include social organization, institutions, diversity, interactions between human groups, and ethics in the discipline.

General Education / Lower Level Courses - B

Basic Computer Science

BCIS 1301. Microcomputer Applications. 3 Semester Credit Hours.

Overview of computer information systems. Introduces computer hardware, software, procedures, systems, and human resources and explores their integration and application in business and other segments in society. The fundamentals of computer problem solving and programming in a higher level programming language may be discussed and applied.

Biology

BIOL 1411. General Botany. 4 Semester Credit Hours.

Fundamental biological concepts relevant to plant physiology, life cycle, growth and development, structure and function, and cellular and molecular metabolism. The role of plants in the environment, evolution, and phylogeny of major plant groups, algae, and fungi.

BIOL 1413. General Zoology. 4 Semester Credit Hours.

Fundamental biological concepts relevant to animals, including systematics, evolution, structure and function, cellular and molecular metabolism, reproduction, development, diversity, phylogeny, and ecology.

BIOL 2301. Anatomy & Physiology I. 3 Semester Credit Hours.

Anatomy and Physiology I is the first part of a two course sequence. It is a study of the structure and function of the human body including cells, tissues and organs of the following systems: integumentary, skeletal, muscular, nervous and special senses. Emphasis is on interrelationships among systems and regulation of physiological functions involved in maintaining homeostasis.

BIOL 2401. Anatomy and Physiology I. 4 Semester Credit Hours.

Anatomy and Physiology I is the first part of a two course sequence. It is a study of the structure and function of the human body including cells, tissues and organs of the following systems: integumentary, skeletal, muscular, nervous and special senses. Emphasis is on interrelationships among systems and regulation of physiological functions involved in maintaining homeostasis.

BIOL 2402. Anatomy and Physiology II. 4 Semester Credit Hours.

Anatomy and Physiology II is the second part of a two-course sequence. It is a study of the structure and function of the human body including the following systems: endocrine, cardiovascular, immune, lymphatic, respiratory, digestive (including nutrition), urinary (including fluid and electrolyte balance), and reproductive (including human development and genetics). Emphasis is on interrelationships among systems and regulation of physiological functions involved in maintaining homeostasis.

BIOL 2421. Microbiology for Science Majors. 4 Semester Credit Hours.

Principles of microbiology, including metabolism, structure, function, genetics, and phylogeny of microbes. The course will also examine the interactions of microbes with each other, hosts, and the environment.

Business

BUSI 1301. Business Principles. 3 Semester Credit Hours.

This course provides a survey of economic systems, forms of business ownership, and considerations for running a business. Students will learn various aspects of business, management, and leadership functions; organizational considerations; and decision-making processes. Financial topics are introduced, including accounting, money and banking, and securities markets. Also included are discussions of business challenges in the legal and regulatory environment, business ethics, social responsibility, and international business. Emphasized is the dynamic role of business in everyday life.

General Education / Lower Level Courses - C

Chemistry

CHEM 1411. General Chemistry I. 4 Semester Credit Hours.

Fundamental principles of chemistry for majors in the sciences, health sciences, and engineering; topics include measurements, fundamental properties of matter, states of matter, chemical reactions, chemical stoichiometry, periodicity of elemental properties, atomic structure, chemical bonding, molecular structure, solutions, properties of gases, and an introduction to thermodynamics and descriptive chemistry. Introduction of the scientific method, experimental design, data collection and analysis, and preparation of laboratory reports.

CHEM 1412. General Chemistry II. 4 Semester Credit Hours.

Chemical equilibrium; phase diagrams and spectrometry; acid-base concepts; thermodynamics; kinetics; electrochemistry; nuclear chemistry; an introduction to organic chemistry and descriptive inorganic chemistry; introduction of the scientific method, experimental design, chemical instrumentation, data collection and analysis, and preparation of laboratory reports.

Computer Science

COSC 1301. Introduction to Computing. 3 Semester Credit Hours.

Overview of computer systems—hardware, operating systems, the Internet, and application software including word processing, spreadsheets, presentation graphics, and databases. Current topics such as the effect of computers on society, and the history and use of computers in business, educational, and other interdisciplinary settings are also studied. This course is not intended to count toward a student's major field of study in business or computer science.

COSC 1336. Programming Fundamentals I. 3 Semester Credit Hours.

This course introduces the fundamental concepts of structured programming, and provides a comprehensive introduction to programming for computer science and technology majors. Topics include software development methodology, data types, control structures, functions, arrays, and the mechanics of running, testing, and debugging. This course assumes computer literacy.

COSC 1337. Programming Fundamentals II. 3 Semester Credit Hours.

This course focuses on the object-oriented programming paradigm, emphasizing the definition and use of classes along with fundamentals of object-oriented design. The course includes basic analysis of algorithms, searching and sorting techniques, and an introduction to software engineering processes. Students will apply techniques for testing and debugging software.

Criminal Justice

CRIJ 1301. Introduction to Criminal Justice. 3 Semester Credit Hours.

This course provides a historical and philosophical overview of the American criminal justice system, including the nature, extent, and impact of crime; criminal law; and justice agencies and processes.

CRIJ 1306. Court Systems & Practices. 3 Semester Credit Hours.

This course is a study of the court system as it applies to the structures, procedures, practices and sources of law in American courts, using federal and Texas statutes and case law.

CRIJ 1310. Fundamentals of Criminal Law. 3 Semester Credit Hours.

This course is the study of criminal law including application of definitions, statutory elements, defenses and penalties using Texas statutes, the Model Penal Code, and case law. The course also analyzes the philosophical and historical development of criminal law and criminal culpability.

CRIJ 2313. Correctional Systems & Practices. 3 Semester Credit Hours.

This course is a survey of institutional and non-institutional corrections. Emphasis will be placed on the organization and operation of correctional systems; treatment and rehabilitation; populations served; Constitutional issues; and current and future issues.

CRIJ 2314. Criminal Investigation. 3 Semester Credit Hours.

Investigative theory; collection and preservation of evidence; sources of information; interview and interrogation; uses of forensic sciences; case and trial preparation.

CRIJ 2328. Police Systems & Practices. 3 Semester Credit Hours.

This course examines the establishment, role and function of police in a democratic society. It will focus on types of police agencies and their organizational structure, police-community interaction, police ethics, and use of authority.

General Education / Lower Level Courses - E

Economics

ECON 2301. Principles of Macroeconomics. 3 Semester Credit Hours.

An analysis of the economy as a whole including measurement and determination of Aggregate Demand and Aggregate Supply, national income, inflation, and unemployment. Other topics include international trade, economic growth, business cycles, and fiscal policy and monetary policy.

ECON 2302. Principles of Microeconomics. 3 Semester Credit Hours.

Analysis of the behavior of individual economic agents, including consumer behavior and demand, producer behavior and supply, price and output decisions by firms under various market structures, factor markets, market failures, and international trade.

Education

EDUC 1301. Introduction to the Teaching Profession. 3 Semester Credit Hours.

An enriched, integrated pre-service course and content experience that provides active recruitment and institutional support of students interested in a teaching career, especially in high need fields. The course provides students with opportunities to participate in early field observations at all levels of P-12 schools with varied and diverse student populations and provides students with support from college and school faculty, preferably in small cohort groups, for the purpose of introduction to and analysis of the culture of schooling and classrooms. Course content should be aligned as applicable with State Board for Educator Certification Pedagogy and Professional Responsibilities standards; and the course must include a minimum of 16 contact hours of field experience in P-12 classrooms.

EDUC 2301. Introduction to Special Populations. 3 Semester Credit Hours.

An enriched, integrated pre-service course and content experience that provides an overview of schooling and classrooms from the perspectives of language, gender, socioeconomic status, ethnic and academic diversity, and equity with an emphasis on factors that facilitate learning. The course provides students with opportunities to participate in early field observations of P- 12 special populations and should be aligned as applicable with State Board for Educator Certification Pedagogy and Professional Responsibilities standards. Must include a minimum of 16 contact hours of field experience in P-12 classrooms with special populations.

English

ENGL 1301. Composition I. 3 Semester Credit Hours.

Intensive study of and practice in writing processes, from invention and researching to drafting, revising, and editing, both individually and collaboratively. Emphasis on effective rhetorical choices, including audience, purpose, arrangement, and style. Focus on writing the academic essay as a vehicle for learning, communicating, and critical analysis.

ENGL 1302. Composition II. 3 Semester Credit Hours.

Intensive study of and practice in the strategies and techniques for developing research-based expository and persuasive texts. Emphasis on effective and ethical rhetorical inquiry, including primary and secondary research methods; critical reading of verbal, visual, and multimedia texts; systematic evaluation, synthesis, and documentation of information sources; and critical thinking about evidence and conclusions.

General Education / Lower Level Courses - F

French

FREN 1411. Beginning French I. 4 Semester Credit Hours.

Fundamental skills in listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. Includes basic vocabulary, grammatical structures, and culture.

FREN 1412. Beginning French II. 4 Semester Credit Hours.

Fundamental skills in listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. Includes basic vocabulary, grammatical structures, and culture.

FREN 2311. Intermediate French I. 3 Semester Credit Hours.

Review and application of skills in listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. Emphasizes conversation, vocabulary acquisition, reading, composition, and culture.

FREN 2312. Intermediate French II. 3 Semester Credit Hours.

Review and application of skills in listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. Emphasizes conversation, vocabulary acquisition, reading, composition, and culture.

General Education / Lower Level Courses - G

Geography

GEOG 1301. Physical Geography. 3 Semester Credit Hours.

This course introduces students to the processes that drive Earth’s physical systems. Students will explore the relationships among these physical systems, with emphasis on weather and climate, water, ecosystems, geologic processes and landform development, and human interactions with the physical environment.

GEOG 1302. Human Geography. 3 Semester Credit Hours.

This course introduces students to fundamental concepts, skills, and practices of human geography. Place, space, and scale serve as a framework for understanding patterns of human experience. Topics for discussion may include globalization, population and migration, culture, diffusion, political and economic systems, language, religion, gender, and ethnicity.

GEOG 1303. World Regional Geography. 3 Semester Credit Hours.

This course is an introduction to the world’s major regions seen through their defining physical, social, cultural, political, and economic features. These regions are examined in terms of their physical and human characteristics and their interactions. The course emphasizes relations among regions on issues such as trade, economic development, conflict, and the role of regions in the globalization process.

German

GERM 1411. Beginning German I. 4 Semester Credit Hours.

Fundamental skills in listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. Includes basic vocabulary, grammatical structures, and culture.

GERM 1412. Beginning German II. 4 Semester Credit Hours.

Fundamental skills in listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. Includes basic vocabulary, grammatical structures, and culture.

GERM 2311. Intermediate German I. 3 Semester Credit Hours.

Review and application of skills in listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. Emphasizes conversation, vocabulary acquisition, reading, composition, and culture.

GERM 2312. Intermediate German II. 3 Semester Credit Hours.

Review and application of skills in listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. Emphasizes conversation, vocabulary acquisition, reading, composition, and culture.

Government

GOVT 2305. Federal Government. 3 Semester Credit Hours.

Origin and development of the U.S. Constitution, structure and powers of the national government including the legislative, executive, and judicial branches, federalism, political participation, the national election process, public policy, civil liberties and civil rights.

GOVT 2306. Texas Government. 3 Semester Credit Hours.

Origin and development of the Texas constitution, structure and powers of state and local government, federalism and inter-governmental relations, political participation, the election process, public policy, and the political culture of Texas.

General Education / Lower Level Courses - H

History

HIST 1301. United States History I. 3 Semester Credit Hours.

A survey of the social, political, economic, cultural, and intellectual history of the United States from the pre-Columbian era to the Civil War/Reconstruction period. United States History I includes the study of pre-Columbian, colonial, revolutionary, early national, slavery and sectionalism, and the Civil War/Reconstruction eras. Themes that may be addressed in United States History I include: American settlement and diversity, American culture, religion, civil and human rights, technological change, economic change, immigration and migration, and creation of the federal government.

HIST 1302. United States History II. 3 Semester Credit Hours.

A survey of the social, political, economic, cultural, and intellectual history of the United States from the Civil War/Reconstruction era to the present. United States History II examines industrialization, immigration, world wars, the Great Depression, Cold War and post-Cold War eras. Themes that may be addressed in United States History II include: American culture, religion, civil and human rights, technological change, economic change, immigration and migration, urbanization and suburbanization, the expansion of the federal government, and the study of U.S. foreign policy.

HIST 2301. Texas History. 3 Semester Credit Hours.

A survey of the political, social, economic, cultural, and intellectual history of Texas from the pre-Columbian era to the present. Themes that may be addressed in Texas History include: Spanish colonization and Spanish Texas; Mexican Texas; the Republic of Texas; statehood and secession; oil, industrialization, and urbanization; civil rights; and modern Texas.

HIST 2311. Western Civilization I. 3 Semester Credit Hours.

A survey of the social, political, economic, cultural, religious, and intellectual history of Europe and the Mediterranean world from human origins to the 17th century. Themes that should be addressed in Western Civilization I include the cultural legacies of Mesopotamia, Egypt, Greece, Rome, Byzantium, Islamic civilizations, and Europe through the Middle Ages, Renaissance, and Reformations.

HIST 2312. Western Civilization II. 3 Semester Credit Hours.

A survey of the social, political, economic, cultural, religious, and intellectual history of Europe and the Mediterranean world from the 17th century to the modern era. Themes that should be addressed in Western Civilization II include absolutism and constitutionalism, growth of nation states, the Enlightenment, revolutions, classical liberalism, industrialization, imperialism, global conflict, the Cold War, and globalism.

Humanities

HUMA 1315. Fine Arts Appreciation. 3 Semester Credit Hours.

This course is an exploration of the purposes and processes in the visual and performing arts (such as music, painting, architecture, drama, and dance) and the ways in which they express the values of cultures and human experience.

General Education / Lower Level Courses - L

Languages

LANG 1411. Foreign Language I. 4 Semester Credit Hours.

Fundamental skills in listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. Includes basic vocabulary, grammatical structures, and culture.

LANG 1412. Foreign Language II. 4 Semester Credit Hours.

Fundamental skills in listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. Includes basic vocabulary, grammatical structures, and culture.

LANG 2311. Intermediate Language I. 3 Semester Credit Hours.

Review and application of skills in listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. Emphasizes conversation, vocabulary acquisition, reading, composition, and culture.

LANG 2312. Intermediate Language II. 3 Semester Credit Hours.

Review and application of skills in listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. Emphasizes conversation, vocabulary acquisition, reading, composition, and culture.

General Education / Lower Level Courses - M

Mathematics

MATH 1314. College Algebra. 3 Semester Credit Hours.

In-depth study and applications of polynomial, rational, radical, exponential and logarithmic functions, and systems of equations using matrices. Additional topics such as sequences, series, probability, and conics may be included.

MATH 1316. Plane Trigonometry. 3 Semester Credit Hours.

In-depth study and applications of trigonometry including definitions, identities, inverse functions, solutions of equations, graphing, and solving triangles. Additional topics such as vectors, polar coordinates and parametric equations may be included.

MATH 1324. Mathematics for Business & Social Sciences. 3 Semester Credit Hours.

The application of common algebraic functions, including polynomial, exponential, logarithmic, and rational, to problems in business, economics, and the social sciences are addressed. The applications include mathematics of finance, including simple and compound interest and annuities; systems of linear equations; matrices; linear programming; and probability, including expected value.

MATH 1325. Calculus for Business & Social Sciences. 3 Semester Credit Hours.

This course is the basic study of limits and continuity, differentiation, optimization and graphing, and integration of elementary functions, with emphasis on applications in business, economics, and social sciences.

MATH 1332. Contemporary Mathematics. 3 Semester Credit Hours.

Intended for Non STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics) majors. Topics include introductory treatments of sets and logic, financial mathematics, probability and statistics with appropriate applications. Number sense, proportional reasoning, estimation, technology, and communication should be embedded throughout the course. Additional topics may be covered.

MATH 1342. Elementary Statistical Methods. 3 Semester Credit Hours.

Collection, analysis, presentation and interpretation of data, and probability. Analysis includes descriptive statistics, correlation and regression, confidence intervals and hypothesis testing. Use of appropriate technology is recommended.

MATH 1350. Mathematics for Teachers I. 3 Semester Credit Hours.

This course is intended to build or reinforce a foundation in fundamental mathematics concepts and skills. It includes the conceptual development of the following: sets, functions, numeration systems, number theory, and properties of the various number systems with an emphasis on problem solving and critical thinking.

MATH 1351. Mathematics for Teachers II. 3 Semester Credit Hours.

This course is intended to build or reinforce a foundation in fundamental mathematics concepts and skills. It includes the concepts of geometry, measurement, probability, and statistics with an emphasis on problem solving and critical thinking.

MATH 1414. College Algebra. 4 Semester Credit Hours.

In-depth study and applications of polynomial, rational, radical, exponential and logarithmic functions, and systems of equations using matrices. Additional topics such as sequences, series, probability, and conics may be included.

MATH 2305. Discrete Mathematics. 3 Semester Credit Hours.

A course designed to prepare math, computer science, and engineering majors for a background in abstraction, notation, and critical thinking for the mathematics most directly related to computer science. Topics include: logic, relations, functions, basic set theory, countability and counting arguments, proof techniques, mathematical induction, combinatorics, discrete probability, recursion, sequence and recurrence, elementary number theory, graph theory, and mathematical proof techniques.

MATH 2312. Pre-Calculus Math. 3 Semester Credit Hours.

In-depth combined study of algebra, trigonometry, and other topics for calculus readiness.

MATH 2313. Calculus I. 3 Semester Credit Hours.

Limits and continuity; the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus; definition of the derivative of a function and techniques of differentiation; applications of the derivative to maximizing or minimizing a function; the hain rule, mean value theorem, and rate of change problems; curve sketching; definite and indefinite tegration of algebraic, trigonometric, and transcendental functions, with an application to calculation of areas.

MATH 2314. Calculus II. 3 Semester Credit Hours.

Differentiation and integration of transcendental functions; parametric equations and polar coordinates; techniques of integration; sequences and series; improper integrals.

MATH 2412. Pre-Calculus Math. 4 Semester Credit Hours.

In-depth combined study of algebra, trigonometry, and other topics for calculus readiness.

MATH 2413. Calculus I. 4 Semester Credit Hours.

Limits and continuity; the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus; definition of the derivative of a function and techniques of differentiation; applications of the derivative to maximizing or minimizing a function; the chain rule, mean value theorem, and rate of change problems; curve sketching; definite and indefinite integration of algebraic, trigonometric, and transcendental functions, with an application to calculation of areas.

MATH 2414. Calculus II. 4 Semester Credit Hours.

Differentiation and integration of transcendental functions; parametric equations and polar coordinates; techniques of integration; sequences and series; improper integrals.

MATH 2415. Calculus III. 4 Semester Credit Hours.

Advanced topics in calculus, including vectors and vector-valued functions, partial differentiation, Lagrange multipliers, multiple integrals, and Jacobians; application of the line integral, including Green’s Theorem, the Divergence Theorem, and Stokes’ Theorem.

Music

MUSI 1301. Fundamentals of Music I. 3 Semester Credit Hours.

Introduction to the basic elements of music theory for non-music majors: scales, intervals, keys, triads, elementary ear training, keyboard harmony, notation, meter, and rhythm. (Does not apply to a music major degree.).

MUSI 1310. American Music. 3 Semester Credit Hours.

General survey of various styles of music in America. Topics may include jazz, ragtime, folk, rock, and contemporary art music.

General Education / Lower Level Courses - P

Philosophy

PHIL 1301. Introduction to Philosophy. 3 Semester Credit Hours.

A study of major issues in philosophy and/or the work of major philosophical figures in philosophy. Topics in philosophy may include theories of reality, theories of knowledge, theories of value, and their practical applications.

PHIL 2303. Introduction to Formal Logic. 3 Semester Credit Hours.

The purpose of the course is to introduce the student to symbolic logic, including syllogisms, propositional and predicate logic, and logical proofs in a system of rules.

Physics

PHYS 1401. College Physics I. 4 Semester Credit Hours.

Fundamental principles of physics, using algebra and trigonometry; the principles and applications of classical mechanics and thermodynamics, including harmonic motion, mechanical waves and sound, physical systems, Newton’s Laws of Motion, and gravitation and other fundamental forces; with emphasis on problem solving. Laboratory activities will reinforce fundamental principles of physics, using algebra and trigonometry; the principles and applications of classical mechanics and thermodynamics, including harmonic motion, mechanical waves and sound, physical systems, Newton’s Laws of Motion, and gravitation and other fundamental forces; emphasis will be on problem solving.

PHYS 1402. College Physics II. 4 Semester Credit Hours.

Fundamental principles of physics, using algebra and trigonometry; the principles and applications of electricity and magnetism, including circuits, electrostatics, electromagnetism, waves, sound, light, optics, and modern physics topics; with emphasis on problem solving. Laboratory activities will reinforce fundamental principles of physics, using algebra and trigonometry; the principles and applications of electricity and magnetism, including circuits, electrostatics, electromagnetism, waves, sound, light, optics, and modern physics topics; with emphasis on problem solving.

PHYS 1405. Elementary Physics I. 4 Semester Credit Hours.

Conceptual level survey of topics in physics intended for liberal arts and other non-science majors.

PHYS 1415. Physical Science I (Lecture + Lab). 4 Semester Credit Hours.

Course, designed for non-science majors, that surveys topics from physics, chemistry, geology, astronomy, and meteorology.

PHYS 2125. University Physics Laboratory I (Lab). 1 Semester Credit Hour.

Basic laboratory experiments supporting theoretical principles presented in PHYS 2325 involving the principles and applications of classical mechanics, including harmonic motion and physical systems; experimental design, data collection and analysis, and preparation of laboratory reports.

PHYS 2126. University Physics Laboratory II (Lab). 1 Semester Credit Hour.

Laboratory experiments supporting theoretical principles presented in PHYS 2326 involving the principles of electricity and magnetism, including circuits, electromagnetism, waves, sound, light, and optics; experimental design, data collection and analysis, and preparation of laboratory reports.

PHYS 2325. University Physics I. 3 Semester Credit Hours.

Fundamental principles of physics, using calculus, for science, computer science, and engineering majors; the principles and applications of classical mechanics, including harmonic motion, physical systems and thermodynamics; and emphasis on problem solving.

PHYS 2326. University Physics II. 3 Semester Credit Hours.

Principles of physics for science, computer science, and engineering majors, using calculus, involving the principles of electricity and magnetism, including circuits, electromagnetism, waves, sound, light, and optics.

PHYS 2425. University Physics I. 4 Semester Credit Hours.

Fundamental principles of physics, using calculus, for science, computer science, and engineering majors; the principles and applications of classical mechanics, including harmonic motion, physical systems and thermodynamics; and emphasis on problem solving. involving the principles and applications of classical mechanics, lab activities include harmonic motion and physical systems; experimental design, data collection and analysis, and preparation of laboratory reports.

PHYS 2426. University Physics II. 4 Semester Credit Hours.

Principles of physics for science, computer science, and engineering majors, using calculus, lab activities: the principles of electricity and magnetism, including circuits, electromagnetism, waves, sound, light, and optics.

Psychology

PSYC 2301. General Psychology. 3 Semester Credit Hours.

General Psychology is a survey of the major psychological topics, theories and approaches to the scientific study of behavior and mental processes.

PSYC 2308. Child Psychology. 3 Semester Credit Hours.

This course will address psychological development from conception through middle childhood with references to physical, cognitive, social and personality changes. Students will examine the interplay of biological factors, human interaction, social structures and cultural forces in development.

PSYC 2314. Lifespan Growth & Development. 3 Semester Credit Hours.

Life-Span Growth and Development is a study of social, emotional, cognitive and physical factors and influences of a developing human from conception to death.

PSYC 2315. Psychology of Adjustment. 3 Semester Credit Hours.

Study of the processes involved in adjustment of individuals to their personal and social environments.

General Education / Lower Level Courses - S

Sociology

SOCI 1301. Introduction to Sociology. 3 Semester Credit Hours.

The scientific study of human society, including ways in which groups, social institutions, and individuals affect each other. Causes of social stability and social change are explored through the application of various theoretical perspectives, key concepts, and related research methods of sociology. Analysis of social issues in their institutional context may include topics such as social stratification, gender, race/ethnicity, and deviance.

Spanish

SPAN 1311. Beginning Spanish I. 3 Semester Credit Hours.

Basic Spanish language skills in listening, speaking, reading, and writing within a cultural framework. Students will acquire the vocabulary and grammatical structures necessary to communicate and comprehend at the beginner level.

SPAN 1312. Beginning Spanish II. 3 Semester Credit Hours.

Continued development of basic Spanish language skills in listening, speaking, reading, and writing within a cultural framework. Students acquire the vocabulary and grammatical structures necessary to communicate and comprehend at the high beginner to low intermediate level.

SPAN 1411. Beginning Spanish I. 4 Semester Credit Hours.

Basic Spanish language skills in listening, speaking, reading, and writing within a cultural framework. Students will acquire the vocabulary and grammatical structures necessary to communicate and comprehend at the beginner level.

SPAN 1412. Beginning Spanish II. 4 Semester Credit Hours.

Continued development of basic Spanish language skills in listening, speaking, reading, and writing within a cultural framework. Students acquire the vocabulary and grammatical structures necessary to communicate and comprehend at the high beginner to low intermediate level.

SPAN 2311. Intermediate Spanish I. 3 Semester Credit Hours.

The consolidation of skills acquired at the introductory level. Further development of proficiency in listening, speaking, reading and writing. Emphasis on comprehension, appreciation, and interpretation of the cultures of the Spanish-speaking world.

SPAN 2312. Intermediate Spanish II. 3 Semester Credit Hours.

The consolidation of skills acquired at the introductory level. Further development of proficiency in listening, speaking, reading and writing. Emphasis on comprehension, appreciation, and interpretation of the cultures of the Spanish-speaking world.

Speech

SPCH 1311. Introduction to Speech Communication. 3 Semester Credit Hours.

Introduces basic human communication principles and theories embedded in a variety of contexts including interpersonal, small group, and public speaking.

SPCH 1315. Public Speaking. 3 Semester Credit Hours.

Application of communication theory and practice to the public speaking context, with emphasis on audience analysis, speaker delivery, ethics of communication, cultural diversity, and speech organizational techniques to develop students’ speaking abilities, as well as ability to effectively evaluate oral presentations.

SPCH 1318. Interpersonal Communication. 3 Semester Credit Hours.

Application of communication theory to interpersonal relationship development, maintenance, and termination in relationship contexts including friendships, romantic partners, families, and relationships with co-workers and supervisors.

SPCH 1321. Business & Professional Communication. 3 Semester Credit Hours.

Study and application of communication within the business and professional context. Special emphasis will be given to communication competencies in presentations, dyads, teams and technologically mediated formats.

General Education / Lower Level Courses - T 

Early Childhood Education

TECA 1303. Families, School, & Community. 3 Semester Credit Hours.

A study of the child, family, community, and schools, including parent education and involvement, family and community lifestyles, child abuse, and current family life issues. 241 Course content must be aligned as applicable with State Board for Educator Certification Pedagogy and Professional Responsibilities standards and coincide with the National Association for the Education of Young Children position statement related to developmentally appropriate practices for children from birth through age eight. Requires students to participate in field experiences with children from infancy through age 12 in a variety of settings with varied and diverse populations. The course includes a minimum of 16 hours of field experiences.

TECA 1354. Child Growth & Development. 3 Semester Credit Hours.

A study of the physical, emotional, social, language, and cognitive factors impacting growth and development of children through adolescence.