MCJ Criminal Justice

https://www.tamuct.edu/degrees/graduate/criminal-justice.html

OVERVIEW

In addition to advancing the mission of A&M-Central Texas and the College of Arts and Sciences, the mission of the Master of Criminal Justice program is to prepare students for advancement in criminal justice career fields, for further graduate study, and for teaching criminal justice at the college level.  Program objectives are based on the assumption that criminal justice decision making and policy making in society require broad academic experience, innovative thinking, understanding of the theoretical foundations of the field, knowledge of appropriate research methods, and principles of administration.

Graduates are expected to be:

1. conversant with the theoretical and legal principles implicit in criminal justice administration;

2. knowledgeable about essential research contributions in the field;

3. capable of research analysis appropriate to the field; and

4. competent to assume administrative responsibilities involving decision-making in criminal justice administration.

Program Level Student Learning Outcomes

The student will be able to:

  1. Identify current theories and research relating to criminal justice in order to implement appropriate responses to crime.

  2. Apply research methods to test theory and apply in addressing public safety concerns.

  3. Manage the specialized resources (physical and personnel) available to criminal justice agencies.

  4. Discuss the key concepts and evaluate the application of foundational ethical systems to criminal justice practice.

Entry Requirements

Students will be admitted into the MCJ major by the faculty once the following application criteria are met:

Successful admission to graduate school.

And the following:  

University admission to graduate studies does not guarantee admittance to the Master of Science in Criminal Justice program. To be admitted into the MCJ program, you must have:

1.  Undergraduate ( Graduate Coursework) : to include 12 hours in upper-level undergraduate criminal justice courses.  Courses must have been taken in Criminology (Criminal Justice or Sociology), Research Methods (Criminal Justice or Sociology), and Statistics (Criminal Justice, Sociology, or Psychology).  Graduate-level coursework will also apply toward these requirements.

2.  Essay: The applicant will submit an essay as an attachment to an email addressed to the Graduate Office.  The essay should have a minimum of 500-words, double-spaced, and typed in Microsoft Word (Times New Roman 12).  It should be composed of the following:

(1) one's reasons for pursuing the degree, or how the student will use the degree, once awarded,

(2) one's personal or professional experience that relates to criminal justice practice or research, and

(3) one's understanding of how the bachelor's degree (or post-graduate work) has prepared the student for graduate study in criminal justice.

Deadlines for submitting applications are:

August 1 for the Fall semester.

December 1 for the Spring semester.

No new students are accepted for the Summer term.

Applicants will be notified by email or letter regarding whether they are accepted into the program, within two weeks of their application for admission into the program.

Master of Criminal Justice With Thesis - Academic Emphasis Program Requirements

The thesis track is for students seeking to pursue an academic career in teaching, research, and doctoral-level studies.  Students attending online may not select this track. 

All courses applicable to the program must be attained, at least 36 hours are required for the degree.

CRIJ 5300Linear Regression 13
CRIJ 5301Advanced Criminology 13
CRIJ 5303Race and Ethnicity3
CRIJ 5308Victimology3
CRIJ 5315Graduate Proseminar3
CRIJ 5322Advanced Criminal Justice Ethics 13
Emphasis Courses
CRIJ 5321Leadership and Supervision3
CRIJ 5304Advanced Methods in Criminal Justice 13
Choose two of the following:3
CRIJ 5306Criminal Justice Program Evaluation3
or CRIJ 5307 Homeland Security
or CRIJ 5309 Terrorism
or CRIJ 5311 Logistic Regression
or CRIJ 5389 Special Topics in Criminal Justice
or ANTH 5351 Forensic Anthropology
or HLS 5307 Homeland Security
or HLS 5320 Religious Terrorism
or POLI 5316 Conflict Studies
or POLI 5318 Terrorism Studies
or RELS 5304 Sociology of Religion
or RELS 5312 Psychology of Religion
or RELS 5320 Religious Terrorism
or SOCI 5304 Sociology of Religion
or SOCI 5305 Theoretical Sociology
Thesis - Two Semesters
CRIJ 5198Criminal Justice Thesis3
CRIJ 5198Criminal Justice Thesis3
Total Credit Hours36

Master of Criminal Justice Without Thesis - Professional Track Program Requirements

The professional track is for students attending online and students seeking to enhance their professional standing as criminal justice practitioners. This track does not prepare students for college teaching or doctoral work.

All courses applicable to the program must be attained, at least 36 hours are required for the degree.

CRIJ 5300Linear Regression 13
CRIJ 5301Advanced Criminology 13
CRIJ 5303Race and Ethnicity3
CRIJ 5308Victimology3
CRIJ 5315Graduate Proseminar3
CRIJ 5322Advanced Criminal Justice Ethics 13
Emphasis Courses
CRIJ 5307Homeland Security3
CRIJ 5321Leadership and Supervision3
CRIJ 5304Advanced Methods in Criminal Justice 13
or CRIJ 5306 Criminal Justice Program Evaluation
Choose Three of the following9
CRIJ 5304Advanced Methods in Criminal Justice
or CRIJ 5306 Criminal Justice Program Evaluation
or CRIJ 5309 Terrorism
or CRIJ 5311 Logistic Regression
or CRIJ 5389 Special Topics in Criminal Justice
or ANTH 5351 Forensic Anthropology
or HLS 5320 Religious Terrorism
or POLI 5316 Conflict Studies
or POLI 5318 Terrorism Studies
or RELS 5304 Sociology of Religion
or RELS 5312 Psychology of Religion
or RELS 5320 Religious Terrorism
or SOCI 5304 Sociology of Religion
or SOCI 5305 Theoretical Sociology
CRIJ 5090Criminal Justice Comprehensive Examination (Linear Regression)0
CRIJ 5090Criminal Justice Comprehensive Examination (Theory)0
CRIJ 5090Criminal Justice Comprehensive Examination (Methods)0
Total Credit Hours36

Master of Criminal Justice - Homeland Security Emphasis Program Requirements

All courses applicable to the program must be attained, at least 36 hours are required for the degree.

CRIJ 5300Linear Regression 13
CRIJ 5301Advanced Criminology 13
CRIJ 5303Race and Ethnicity3
CRIJ 5308Victimology3
CRIJ 5315Graduate Proseminar3
CRIJ 5322Advanced Criminal Justice Ethics 13
Emphasis Courses
CRIJ 5304Advanced Methods in Criminal Justice3
or CRIJ 5306 Criminal Justice Program Evaluation
HLS 5307Homeland Security3
HLS 5309Terrorism3
HLS 5320Religious Terrorism3
HLS 5321Leadership and Supervision3
HLS 5370Foundations of Information Security3
CRIJ 5090Criminal Justice Comprehensive Examination (Linear Regression)0
CRIJ 5090Criminal Justice Comprehensive Examination (Theory)0
CRIJ 5090Criminal Justice Comprehensive Examination (Methods)0
Total Credit Hours36

Criminal Justice Courses

CRIJ 1301. Introduction to Criminal Justice. 3 Credit Hours.

(080) This course provides a historical and philosophical overview of the American criminal justice system, including the nature, extent, and impact of crime; criminal law; and justice agencies and processes.

CRIJ 1306. Court Systems & Practices. 3 Credit Hours.

(080) This course is a study of the court system as it applies to the structures, procedures, practices and sources of law in American courts, using federal and Texas statutes and case law.

CRIJ 1307. Crime in America. 3 Credit Hours.

(080) American crime problems in historical perspective, social and public policy factors affecting crime, impact and crime trends, social characteristics of specific crimes, and prevention of crime.

CRIJ 1310. Fundamentals of Criminal Law. 3 Credit Hours.

(080) This course is the study of criminal law including application of definitions, statutory elements, defenses and penalties using Texas statutes, the Model Penal Code, and case law. The course also analyzes the philosophical and historical development of criminal law and criminal culpability.

CRIJ 2313. Correctional Systems & Practices. 3 Credit Hours.

(080) This course is a survey of institutional and non-institutional corrections. Emphasis will be placed on the organization and operation of correctional systems; treatment and rehabilitation; populations served; Constitutional issues; and current and future issues.

CRIJ 2314. Criminal Investigation. 3 Credit Hours.

Investigative theory; collection and preservation of evidence; sources of information; interview and interrogation; uses of forensic sciences; case and trial preparation.

CRIJ 2328. Police Systems & Practices. 3 Credit Hours.

(080) This course examines the establishment, role and function of police in a democratic society. It will focus on types of police agencies and their organizational structure, police-community interaction, police ethics, and use of authority.

CRIJ 3300. Juvenile Delinquency. 3 Credit Hours.

Study the nature, extent, causation, treatment, and prevention of juvenile delinquency, including a survey of the procedures and operations of the juvenile justice agencies.

CRIJ 3301. Female Offenders. 3 Credit Hours.

Study female offenders in the criminal justice system, including historical perspectives, juvenile offenders, programming and treatment, and prison and community corrections.

CRIJ 3305. Criminology. 3 Credit Hours.

Study and critique various theories of crime causation, including an examination of classical, biological, psychological, and sociological perspectives on the etiology of crime. Maybe crosslisted with SOCI 3305. Only one may be taken for credit.

CRIJ 3310. Criminal Justice Supervision and Management. 3 Credit Hours.

Study theories and principles of supervision as applied to criminal justice agencies including organization, leadership, motivation, human resources flow, and managerial ethics. Prerequisite(s): Junior classification or permission of instructor.

CRIJ 3311. Techniques of Interviewing. 3 Credit Hours.

Study interview and interrogation techniques, including preparation, environmental and psychological factors, legal issues, and ethics.

CRIJ 3315. Criminal Evidence. 3 Credit Hours.

Analyze the procedures and rules of evidence applied to the acquisition, offering, admissibility, and presentation of evidence from the crime scene, courtroom, and appellate court perspectives.

CRIJ 3316. Methods of Criminal Justice Research. 3 Credit Hours.

(WI) Learn the methods of criminological and criminal justice research, with emphasis on research ethics, research design, and methods of data collection and analysis.

CRIJ 3320. Policing. 3 Credit Hours.

Examine law enforcement, and the role of police in communities and society. Learn to critically evaluate policing as a profession. Special emphasis on dispelling myths and providing tools needed to reach conclusions based upon the available research in the field of police work.

CRIJ 3325. Institutional Corrections. 3 Credit Hours.

Study the structure and function of correctional systems and how various philosophies of correctional treatment affect the operation of confinement institutions.

CRIJ 3330. Community Corrections. 3 Credit Hours.

Study the philosophy, administrative procedures, and operational techniques used in the community based treatment and supervision of offenders.

CRIJ 3340. Homeland Security. 3 Credit Hours.

Study the strategic, legal, policy, operational, and organizational issues associated with the defense of the U.S. homeland from foreign and domestic terrorist threats. Examine the psychology of mass movements, terrorists' ideology, religion and terror, legal issues in homeland security, weapons of mass destruction, effective interfacing between local, state, and federal agencies, emergency management operations, and dealing with mass casualties.

CRIJ 3345. Criminal Justice and Moving Images. 3 Credit Hours.

Explore the role of film, television, and other moving images in the development of perceptions and stereotypes of criminals, victims, and criminal justice professionals, and institutions.

CRIJ 3352. Physical Aspects of Forensic Science. 3 Credit Hours.

Examines various forensic physical sciences and their relation to crime scene investigation and the collection, preservation and identification of evidence. Introduces methods of laboratory analysis of fingerprints, firearms, tool marks, and documents, and evaluates trace evidence, such as glass, soil, paint, hairs, and fibers. Materials fee $15.

CRIJ 3353. Biological Aspects of Forensic Science. 3 Credit Hours.

Examines various forensic biological sciences and their relation to crime scene investigation and the collection, preservation and identification of evidence. Introduces methods of laboratory analysis including forensic disciplines of pathology, anthropology, odontology, entomology, toxicology, serology, DNA, and blood pattern analysis. Materials fee $15.

CRIJ 3384. Criminal Justice Field Experience. 3 Credit Hours.

Application and integration of academic content and development of skills within a criminal justice setting. Entry into this course will be arranged with the internship coordinator. May be taken more than once for credit. Field experience fee $75.

CRIJ 4300. Treatment in Corrections. 3 Credit Hours.

Examines the various types of treatment provided in corrections. Students learn about treatment practices and programs used in corrections, with an emphasis on evidence-based practices. Examines research on the effectiveness of treatment programs.

CRIJ 4303. Race, Crime, and Justice. 3 Credit Hours.

Examines racial profiling, immigration, and the death penalty in the context of criminal justice practice. Provides current issues regarding the relationship between race and ethnicity and all components of the criminal justice system in the US.

CRIJ 4308. Victimology. 3 Credit Hours.

This course includes a comprehensive study of victimization, including the relationship between the victims and offenders, and their interaction with the criminal justice system.

CRIJ 4312. Criminal Justice Ethics. 3 Credit Hours.

(WI) Analyze contemporary ethical issues in crime and justice. Classical and contemporary ethical theories are applied to the discussion of such issues as discretion, corruption, use of force, racism, deception, professionalism, and the nature and meaning of justice.

CRIJ 4315. Criminal Justice Statistics. 3 Credit Hours.

Learn statistical concepts and techniques that can assist in evaluating research. Techniques include measures of central tendency, dispersion, and significance. Examine hypothesis testing using t-tests, ANOVA, and Chi square, and learn to manipulate, analyze, and interpret data using SPSS.

CRIJ 4316. Methods of Criminal Justice Research. 3 Credit Hours.

(WI) Learn the methods of criminological and criminal justice research, with emphasis on research ethics, research design, and methods of data collection and analysis.

CRIJ 4320. Criminal Justice Statistics II. 3 Credit Hours.

Learn intermediate-level statistics used in Criminal Justice research, with focus on statistical analyses commonly used in hypothesis testing with an introduction to measures of association and multivariate analyses. Prerequisite(s): CRIJ 4315 or permission of instructor.

CRIJ 4350. Advanced Investigation. 3 Credit Hours.

Explore advanced criminal and civil investigation, with an introduction to special investigative techniques. Emphasis on crime scene processing, crime scene analysis, forensic evaluations, investigative techniques, and investigative surveys.

CRIJ 4351. Forensic Anthropology. 3 Credit Hours.

Applies the science of physical anthropology to the legal investigative process. Identifies human remains, as well as age, sex, ancestry, and stature of those remains and how these are used to help establish positive identification. Special emphasis placed on skeletal trauma and pathology to determine cause and manner of death. Cross-listed with ANTH 4351; only one may be taken for credit. Material fee $15.

CRIJ 4388. Criminal Justice Problems. 3 Credit Hours.

Engage in independent reading, research, and discussion on selected criminal justice topics. Entry into this course will be arranged by the instructor.

CRIJ 4389. Special Topics in Criminal Justice. 3 Credit Hours.

Explore selected criminal justice topics. Topics will vary according to timeliness and special needs. May be taken more than once for credit.

CRIJ 4395. Criminal Justice Senior Seminar. 3 Credit Hours.

(WI) Utilize knowledge of the criminal justice system in the capstone of the criminal justice curriculum. Examine current practices related to operations, recruitment, testing, training, and law, to prepare for entry to the criminal justice profession. Prerequisite(s): CRIJ 3305, CRIJ 3310 and CRIJ 4316. Restricted to senior-year CJ majors.

CRIJ 5090. Criminal Justice Comprehensive Examination. 0 Credit Hours.

Study and integrate criminal justice knowledge in order to take the criminal justice comprehensive exam for non-thesis students. Non-thesis students should register for the comprehensive examination during their final semester of graduate coursework, or upon permission of advisor. All comprehensive examinations will be written, but an oral component may also be required. A maximum of three attempts will be allowed. Thesis students do not take this examination.

CRIJ 5198. Criminal Justice Thesis. 1-3 Credit Hours.

Prepare and write a graduate thesis in the field of criminal justice. This course represents a student's initial and continuing thesis enrollment. At least six total hours is required to complete the thesis requirement. The student continues to enroll in this course until the thesis is submitted and the thesis is successfully defended.

CRIJ 5300. Linear Regression. 3 Credit Hours.

Introduces students to statistical concepts and techniques that can assist them in evaluating research and in engaging in research on the graduate level. Both bivariate and multiple regression techniques will provide the main content of the course. Prerequisite(s): 3 hours in undergraduate or graduate statistics, or consent of instructor.

CRIJ 5301. Advanced Criminology. 3 Credit Hours.

Examine major theoretical perspectives of crime and deviance. Analyze theories for their logical and empirical adequacy in light of what is known about the distribution of crime and deviant behavior. Prerequisite(s): Undergraduate or graduate coursework in Criminology or permission of instructor.

CRIJ 5303. Race and Ethnicity. 3 Credit Hours.

Examine issues related to racial and ethnic minorities and crime in America, including perceptions of race, class, offending, and victimization. Emphasis on disparities in offending, victimization, law enforcement practices, trial process, and sentencing.

CRIJ 5304. Advanced Methods in Criminal Justice. 3 Credit Hours.

Study social scientific research methods applied to criminal justice research, and critically examine research designs and published findings. Includes an advanced review of procedures and techniques for research in criminology, law enforcement, courts, and corrections. Prerequisite(s): Undergraduate or Graduate course in Research Methods or permission of instructor.

CRIJ 5306. Criminal Justice Program Evaluation. 3 Credit Hours.

Learn to define program evaluation, the need for program evaluations, and the methods used to conduct evaluations.

CRIJ 5307. Homeland Security. 3 Credit Hours.

Study strategic, legal, policy, operational, and organizational issues associated with the defense of the U.S. homeland from foreign and domestic terrorist threats. Topics include legal issues in Homeland Security, effective interfacing between local, state, and federal agencies, emergency management operations, and planned response strategies. Maybe crosslisted with HLS 5307. Only one may be taken for credit.

CRIJ 5308. Victimology. 3 Credit Hours.

This course includes a comprehensive study of victimization, including the relationship between the victims and offenders, and their interaction with the criminal justice system. Students will provide a literature review on a topic of interest.

CRIJ 5309. Terrorism. 3 Credit Hours.

Examine the definitions, history, beliefs, practices, organizational structure, and conflicts involved in terrorist activities. Address funding and criminal connections with terrorist organizations, efforts at counterterrorism as well as the psychological aspects of suicide terrorism.

CRIJ 5311. Logistic Regression. 3 Credit Hours.

Introduces students to logistic regression models for estimating discrete or categorical variables.Prerequisite: 3 hours in CRIJ 5300, or consent of instructor.

CRIJ 5315. Graduate Proseminar. 3 Credit Hours.

Introduces students to the department and faculty. Emphasis placed on effective study habits and writing skills associated with research, as well as other activities/parameters that will assist the student in being successful in the program,. This course is cross-listed with HLS 5315; only one may be taken for credit.

CRIJ 5321. Leadership and Supervision. 3 Credit Hours.

Examine leadership and organizational theories focused on identifying problems and solutions in criminal justice management. The case study method and current literature provide experiences on how leadership styles, human resources, and the organizational environment impact management decisions. Maybe crosslisted with HLS 5321. Only one may be taken for credit.

CRIJ 5322. Advanced Criminal Justice Ethics. 3 Credit Hours.

Study the practical implications of moral philosophy and ethics in a free society during the day-to-day administration of a criminal justice agency.

CRIJ 5388. Criminal Justice Problems. 1-3 Credit Hours.

Engage in independent reading, research, and discussion on selected criminal justice topics. Entry into this course will be arranged with the School Director. Students may repeat this course for a total of 6 hours credit when topics vary.

CRIJ 5389. Special Topics in Criminal Justice. 3 Credit Hours.

Examine selected topics related to criminal justice. This course may be repeated when topics vary, for additional course credit.

Homeland Security Courses

HLS 5090. Comprehensive Exam. 0 Credit Hours.

The study and integration of Homeland Security knowledge in order to take the Homeland Security comprehensive exam for non-thesis students. Non-thesis students should register for the comprehensive examination during their final semester of graduate coursework, or upon permission of advisor. All comprehensive examinations will be written. A maximum of three attempts will be allowed. Thesis students do not take this examination.

HLS 5198. Homeland Security Thesis. 1-3 Credit Hours.

Prepare and write a graduate thesis in the field of Homeland Security. This course represents a student's initial and continuing thesis enrollment. At least six total hours is required to complete the thesis requirement. The student continues to enroll in this course until the thesis is submitted and the thesis is successfully defended.

HLS 5300. Linear Regression. 3 Credit Hours.

Introduction to multiple OLS linear regression, use of statpaks and outputs. This course assumes basic competency in upper-level, undergraduate statistics (3 semester hours) and prepares students for comp exams. Prerequisite: undergraduate or graduate coursework in statistics, or instructor approval. This course is cross-listed with CRIJ 5300; only one may be taken for credit.Prerequisite: 3 semesters hours of upper-level, undergraduate statistics, or approval of instructor.

HLS 5301. Advanced Criminology. 3 Credit Hours.

In-depth examination of major theoretical perspectives of crime and delinquency. Theories are analyzed for their logical and empirical adequacy in light of what is known about the distribution of crime. Prerequisite: undergraduate or graduate coursework in criminology/victimology, or instructor approval. This course is cross-listed with CRIJ 5301; only one may be taken for credit. Prerequisite: 3 semesters hours of upper-level, undergraduate or graduate criminology/victimology, or approval of instructor.

HLS 5303. Race and Ethnicity. 3 Credit Hours.

Addresses issues related to racial and ethnic minorities and crime. Perceptions of race, class, offending, and victimization are examined. Disparities in offending, victimization, law enforcement practices, trial processes, and sentencing are examined in depth. This course is cross-listed with CRIJ 5303; only one may be taken for credit.

HLS 5304. Advanced Research Methods. 3 Credit Hours.

The application of social scientific research methods that focus on criminal justice phenomena. Students critically examine research designs and published research. Students produce acceptable research proposals. This course is cross-listed with CRIJ 5304; only one may be taken for credit. Prerequisite: Undergraduate course in Research Methods or approval of instructor.

HLS 5306. Program Evaluation. 3 Credit Hours.

Introduces student to program evaluation, the need for program evaluations, and the methods used to conduct the research. This course is cross-listed with CRIJ 5306; only one may be taken for credit. Prerequisite: Undergraduate course in Research Methods or approval of instructor.

HLS 5307. Homeland Security. 3 Credit Hours.

Study the strategic, legal, policy, operational, and organizational issues associated with the defense of the U.S. homeland from foreign and domestic terrorist threats. Topics include legal issues in Homeland Security, effective interfacing between local, state, and federal agencies, emergency management operations, and planned response strategies. Maybe crosslisted with CRIJ 5307. Only one may be taken for credit.

HLS 5308. Victimology. 3 Credit Hours.

This course includes a comprehensive study of victimization, including the relationship between the victims and offenders, and their interaction with the criminal justice system. Students will provide a literature review on a topic of interest.

HLS 5309. Terrorism. 3 Credit Hours.

Examine the definitions, history, beliefs, practices, organizational structure, and conflicts involved in terrorist activities. Address funding and criminal connections with terrorist organizations, and discuss efforts at counterterrorism as well as the psychological aspects of suicide terrorism. Cross-listed with CRIJ 5309; only one may be taken for credit.

HLS 5315. Graduate Proseminar. 3 Credit Hours.

Introduces students to the department and faculty. Emphasis placed on effective study habits and writing skills associated with research, as well as other activities/parameters that will assist the student in being successful in the program,. This course is cross-listed with CRIJ 5315; only one may be taken for credit.

HLS 5320. Religious Terrorism. 3 Credit Hours.

Examine the religious motivations, support, and tactics behind the phenomena of domestic and foreign terrorism. Review case studies and histories of specific terrorist organizations, and discuss justifications for violence and terrorist targets. Cross listed with RELS 5320; only one may be taken for credit.

HLS 5321. Leadership and Supervision. 3 Credit Hours.

Examine leadership and organizational theories focused on identifying problems and solutions in criminal justice management. Utilize the case study method and current literature to explore how leadership styles, human resources, and the organizational environment impact management decisions. Maybe crosslisted with CRIJ 5321. Only one may be taken for credit.

HLS 5322. Advanced Ethics. 3 Credit Hours.

The practical implications and application of moral philosophy and ethics in a free society during the daily administration of criminal justice agencies and their impact on criminal events. This course is cross-listed with CRIJ 5322; only one may be taken for credit. Prerequisite: Undergraduate course in Ethics or approval of instructor.

HLS 5370. Foundations of Information Security. 3 Credit Hours.

Examine fundamental concepts and principles of information Security Management, and Information Assurance as it affects modern business operations. Explore major issues and legal aspects related to physical, technical, and operational cyber security measures. Develop risk management skills, and learn business access security, communication and network security, operating systems security, and identity and access control management. Maybe crosslisted with CRIJ 5370. Only one may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): None.

Political Science Courses

POLI 3300. Critical Thinking About Politics. 3 Credit Hours.

Introduces students to political science research tools and the application of critical thinking techniques to politics and political science. Topics include finding reliable sources, critically evaluating sources, identifying political agendas and propaganda, using and critiquing polls, and examining the social-scientific approach to political science. Offered in Fall semesters.

POLI 3301. Political Economy of Globalization. 3 Credit Hours.

Examine the demographic, technological, and economic forces that have come together to shape a more culturally, economically, and politically integrated world, and the hard political and economic choices that must be made in competitive environments.

POLI 3302. Elections and Political Parties. 3 Credit Hours.

Study electoral process in American national, state, and local political systems. Special emphasis on the evolution of the structure and functions of political parties, and other participants in the electoral process.

POLI 3303. Comparative State and Local Government. 3 Credit Hours.

Explore variations and similarities in the practice of politics and in the administration of government in the states. Special Emphasis on local government and state-national relations. Prerequisite(s): GOVT 2305, GOVT 2306.

POLI 3304. The Executive Branch. 3 Credit Hours.

Examine the organization of executive power in the United States national, state, and local government systems. Evolution of the structure and functions of the Presidency, national, state and local bureaucracies, the role of parties, legislatures, courts, and interest groups are analyzed as participants in the executive process. Prerequisite(s): GOVT 2305.

POLI 3305. Legislation. 3 Credit Hours.

Examine the legislative process in American national, state, and local political systems. Analyze the evolution of the structure and functions of the Congress and the state legislatures, and the role of executives, courts, parties, interest groups, and other participants in the legislative process. Prerequisite(s): GOVT 2305.

POLI 3306. Political Economy. 3 Credit Hours.

Explore the historical, philosophical, and theoretical relationships between the state and the economy. Prerequisite(s): None.

POLI 3307. Public Administration. 3 Credit Hours.

Examine the concepts and practices of American public administration. Prerequisite(s): GOVT 2305.

POLI 3308. International Politics. 3 Credit Hours.

(WI) Explore the development of the national state system, the problems and issues which have arisen, international agencies created to cope with these problems, and the principles of international conduct.

POLI 3310. Environmental Politics. 3 Credit Hours.

Explore the politics of environmental protection in America. Special emphasis on domestic environmental policy and the affects of federalism in shaping and implementing environmental policies. Prerequisite(s): GOVT 2305.

POLI 3320. Terrorism and Political Violence. 3 Credit Hours.

Examine the causes of terrorism and other forms of political violence, with special emphasis on measures of prevention and counter-terrorism.

POLI 3330. Understanding Social Science Research. 3 Credit Hours.

(WI) Develop skills in political science research, with emphasis on hypothesis testing, measurement, formal modeling, and statistical analysis. Statistical concepts covered include central tendencies and statistical distributions, regression, and maximum likelihood estimation.

POLI 3350. Politics and Propaganda in Film. 3 Credit Hours.

(WI) This course explores the political uses of film, with a particular focus on the uses of the documentary style to influence public opinion. Topics covered include government-sponsored and privately-produced propaganda, the role of film in broader propaganda or political campaigns, and the ethical uses of film in the context of politics.

POLI 3355. Religion and Politics. 3 Credit Hours.

Explore the historic development of church-state relations in the United States, the evolution of church-state constitutional law, and the impact of this history and law on the current political environment. Special Emphasis on the role played by religion in political campaigns, local politics, and interest group activities.

POLI 4302. Constitutional Law II. 3 Credit Hours.

Examine the origin and development of constitutional prohibitions as shown by leading US Supreme Court decisions on civil rights, contracts, due process, economic regulation, eminent domain, labor relations, obscenity, political utterance, and religion. Prerequisite(s): GOVT 2305.

POLI 4303. Political Theory through 1789. 3 Credit Hours.

Philosophical ideas concerning basic political problems from the Greeks to 1789. Prerequisite(s): GOVT 2305, GOVT 2306.

POLI 4304. Political Theory Since 1789. 3 Credit Hours.

Philosophical ideas concerning basic political problems since 1789. Prerequisite(s): GOVT 2305, GOVT 2306.

POLI 4305. Comparative Government and Politics. 3 Credit Hours.

Examine the relationship of government and politics of the major world powers, including topics from Asia, Africa, Europe, and the Americas.

POLI 4310. Environmental Policy. 3 Credit Hours.

Examine the politics of environmental protection worldwide. Special emphasis on international environmental policy and agreements and treaties made by nations to shape and implement environmental policy. Prerequisite(s): GOVT 2305.

POLI 4315. Foreign Policy. 3 Credit Hours.

Study America’s role in the modern world. Particular emphasis is placed on the policy makers, and on external and internal factors which affect decision making.

POLI 4316. Conflict Studies. 3 Credit Hours.

Study the causes of international and civil conflict, historical changes in the nature of war, and predictions of future conflicts.

POLI 4317. Peace Studies. 3 Credit Hours.

Explore the causes of peace, covering bargaining and war termination, social conflict resolution, international cooperation, and the ethics of peace.

POLI 4320. Weapons of Mass Destruction. 3 Credit Hours.

Examine the physical and political effects of chemical, biological, and nuclear weapons, with emphasis on issues of deterrence and arms control.

POLI 4321. Civil Wars and Military Intervention. 3 Credit Hours.

Examine the causes, characteristics, and effects of civil wars, with particular emphasis on preventing the resumption of warfare after peace agreements, and the effect of military intervention on the outcome and recurrence of civil war.

POLI 4340. Political Ethics. 3 Credit Hours.

Compare theories of political ethics from ancient times to the present. Special attention is given to the topics of justice and virtue.

POLI 4341. Freedom and Authority. 3 Credit Hours.

Examine the legitimacy of government and the sources of individual rights. Special attention is given to the idea of a "social contract," restraints on government, arguments for and against restricting liberty, and who should be permitted to participate in politics.

POLI 4350. Government Seminar. 3 Credit Hours.

Explore topics in government with independent reading, research, discussion, and writing, under personal direction of instructor. May be taken more than once for credit. Prerequisite(s): Senior standing, 18 hours of POLI, or permission of Program Coordinator.

POLI 4365. Politics of Literature. 3 Credit Hours.

Examine the politics of fiction through a single author or genre to critically evaluate its role in political persuasion, especially normative political theory. Attention is paid to the political uses of genre conventions and the political power of shared myths. POLI 4365 may be repeated once for credit when the author/genre covered differs.

POLI 4380. Administration of Justice. 3 Credit Hours.

Analyze the structure, function, and interrelationship of the components of the criminal justice system at the federal, state, and local levels, including the history and philosophy of criminal justice in a democratic society.

POLI 4384. Political Science Internship. 3,6 Credit Hours.

Apply and integrate academic study with professional experience in Political Science. Field projects include direction of a political campaign, internship in a city or county administrative office, or in a not-for-profit organization for analyzing or carrying out governmental policy. Minimum of 160 hours of work required for 3 hours of credit. Prerequisite(s): 2.5 overall grade point average, senior standing, and permission of Program Coordinator. Field experience fee $75.

POLI 4388. Political Science Problems. 1-3 Credit Hours.

Explore problems in Political Science with independent reading, research and discussion. Entry into this course will be arranged with the political science advisor and instructor.

POLI 4395. Political Science Capstone. 3 Credit Hours.

(WI) Integrate and use fundamental concepts learned in previous political science courses to research and analyze real-world political phenomena and problems. Students present oral and written reports on their research, supplemented by appropriate internet and multimedia materials, as well as portfolios documenting their research.

POLI 5090. Political Science Comprehensive Examination. 0 Credit Hours.

Non-thesis students should register for the comprehensive examination during their final semester of graduate coursework, or upon permission of advisor. All comprehensive examinations will be written, but an oral component may also be required. A maximum of three attempts will be allowed. Thesis students do not take this examination.

POLI 5300. Political Science Research Methods. 3 Credit Hours.

Learn the elements of research design and statistical analysis. Topics covered include hypothesis-testing, reliability and validity, measures of association, linear regression, and maximum likelihood estimation.

POLI 5301. Political Decision-Making. 3 Credit Hours.

Learn formal models of political decision-making, including game theory, spatial voting models, decision theory, and collective social choice.

POLI 5302. Constitutional Law. 3 Credit Hours.

Predict the resolution of constitutional controversies by examining theories of constitutional interpretation and judicial decision-making in the United States.

POLI 5303. Origins of Conservative Political Thought. 3 Credit Hours.

This course covers the philosophical origins of conservative political thought, focusing on its traditional, statist, and libertarian variants.

POLI 5304. Political Liberalism and its Critics. 3 Credit Hours.

Explore the philosophical assumptions and implications of liberalism, and examine its internal consistency and the extent to which it withstands challenges from competing systems of political thought.

POLI 5305. American Politics. 3 Credit Hours.

Examine basic approaches to the study of American Politics, including major works and recent research on this topic.

POLI 5306. Comparative Politics. 3 Credit Hours.

Examine basic approaches, major works, and recent research on the study of comparative politics and government.

POLI 5307. International Relations. 3 Credit Hours.

Examine basic approaches to the study of the politics of international relations, including major works and recent research on the topic.

POLI 5315. Foreign Policy. 3 Credit Hours.

Learn foreign policy decision-making. Understand how decisions are made, their consequences, and their ethical implications, with special emphasis on the foreign policy decisions of the United States.

POLI 5316. Conflict Studies. 3 Credit Hours.

Study the causes of international and civil conflict, historical changes in the nature of war, and predictions of future armed conflicts.

POLI 5317. Peace Studies. 3 Credit Hours.

Study the causes of peace, covering bargaining and war termination, social conflict resolution, international cooperation, and the ethics of peace.

POLI 5318. Terrorism Studies. 3 Credit Hours.

Study the causes of terrorism and other forms of political violence, with particular emphasis on measures of prevention and counter-terrorism.

POLI 5321. Civil Wars. 3 Credit Hours.

Examine the onset, evolution, and termination of civil wars. Particular emphasis is given to the role that outside actors play in civil wars, including foreign military intervention.

POLI 5330. Theories of Public Management. 3 Credit Hours.

Apply theories of public administration, and study the problems of administrative management in public organizations, and the use of law for administrative decision-making.

POLI 5350. Political Forecasting. 3 Credit Hours.

Research and analyze real-world political phenomena and problems. Learn and use different approaches to political forecasting, with a focus on formal models of politics.

POLI 5352. General Wars in World History. 3 Credit Hours.

Assess theories of war between major powers. Attention is given to structural, economic, and military factors that contribute to world wars, as well as the prospects for a Third World War.

POLI 5355. International Relations of the Middle East. 3 Credit Hours.

Examine the international politics of the Middle East, with particular emphasis on Israel and its regional rivals.

POLI 5360. Political Culture and Public Policy. 3 Credit Hours.

Study the political culture as it forms and is formed by public policy, including the culture of environmental policy, bureaucratic policy, and foreign policy.

POLI 5361. Politics of Education. 3 Credit Hours.

Study the relationship between politics and education in America, including both K-12 and post-secondary systems.

POLI 5362. Environmental Policy. 3 Credit Hours.

Study the politics of the natural environment with emphasis on the role of government in environmental protection.

POLI 5365. Politics of Literature. 3 Credit Hours.

This graduate seminar examines the politics of literature through a single author or genre as a method of introducing and critically evaluating normative political theory. Special attention is paid to the political uses of genre conventions and the political power of shared myths. POLI 5365 may be repeated once for credit when the author/genre covered differs.

POLI 5388. Problems. 1-3 Credit Hours.

Explore selected topics in Political Science. Independent reading, research, discussion, under supervision of senior professor.

POLI 5391. Political Science Practicum. 3 Credit Hours.

Gain professional experience in school administration, counseling, supervision, college or public school teaching, or other public service professions. May be repeated once for credit. Field experience fee: $75.

POLI 5398. Political Science Thesis. 3 Credit Hours.

Scheduled when student is ready to begin thesis. No credit until thesis is accepted.

Religious Studies Courses

RELS 3300. Introduction to Religious Studies. 3 Credit Hours.

Examine religious phenomena from a non-confessional, interdisciplinary academic perspective. Explore the concept of religion as a component of culture in a postmodern, diversified, global community. Survey major religious traditions, and trends throughout the history of the discipline.

RELS 3301. Classical Greek Mythology. 3 Credit Hours.

Study classical myths and legends pertaining to the Greek pantheon, heroes, and other supernatural beings and events. Evaluate samples of English literature alluding to classical Greek mythology, and understand the cultural significance of myth within classical Greek society.

RELS 3302. Dead Sea Scrolls. 3 Credit Hours.

Explore the archaeological discovery of the Dead Sea Scrolls. Examine and interpret content of selected manuscripts. Evaluate the history of controversies surrounding Scrolls management and presentation to the academic world.

RELS 3303. Hebrew Scriptures. 3 Credit Hours.

Examine the canonical Hebrew scriptures in the light of present-day scholarship. Read translated scriptural passages to evaluate sources, historical and cultural milieus, and forms of modern criticism. Reading competency in the Hebrew language is not required.

RELS 3304. World Religions. 3 Credit Hours.

Study the philosophical, ethical, and social dimensions of the religions of the world. Special emphasis on the major world religions, but lesser known religions will be explored to gain a broad view of the diversity of religious experience and tradition.

RELS 3305. Wicca and Neo-Paganism. 3 Credit Hours.

A critical examination of Wicca and Neo-pagan groups in the US. Explores the history of such groups and exposes the student to academic research in this area.

RELS 3329. Church and State. 3 Credit Hours.

Surveys church-state relations in U.S. history. Examines the role religion has played in American political life, culture, and society. This course is cross-listed with HIST 3329; only one may be taken for credit.

RELS 3355. Religion and Politics. 3 Credit Hours.

Explores the historic development of church-state relations in the United States, the evolution of church-state constitutional law, and the impact of this history and law on the current political environment. Special emphasis placed on the role played by religion in political campaigns, local politics, and interest group activities. This course is cross-listed with POLI 3355; only one may be taken for credit.

RELS 4300. Prophets of Ancient Israel. 3 Credit Hours.

Examine prophet types in light of their historical and cultural milieus. Understand the differences between the eponymous ancestors, leaders, wonder-workers, and literary prophets of Ancient Israel, and evaluate the relationship between prophecy, prophets, and scribal culture in the ancient Near East.

RELS 4310. Myth and Ritual. 3 Credit Hours.

Examine the religious beliefs and practices of small-scale societies based upon ethnographic literature. Special emphasis on altered states, shamanism, bewitching, and religious practitioners. Maybe crosslisted with ANTH 4310. Only one may be taken for credit.

RELS 4312. Psychology of Religion. 3 Credit Hours.

Discover the major issues, theories, and psychological approaches to the study of religion, and address the practice of pastoral counseling. Explore the formation of meaning systems, motivation for behaviors, and psychological accounts for religious impulses and phenomena. Prerequisite(s): None.

RELS 4315. Philosophy of Religion. 3 Credit Hours.

Examine religious phenomena, and concepts of God, miracles, claims of religion, the problem of evil, and religious ethics. Study and evaluate the relationship of religion and philosophy, and the place of philosophy within the religious experience. Prerequisite(s): None.

RELS 4320. Religious Terrorism. 3 Credit Hours.

Examine the religious motivations, support, and tactics behind the phenomena of domestic and foreign terrorism. Prerequisite(s): None.

RELS 4330. Religions of the Middle East. 3 Credit Hours.

Examine the history, beliefs, practices, and conflicts behind the major religious traditions of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. Prerequisite(s): None.

RELS 4389. Special Topics in Religion. 3 Credit Hours.

Examine selected topics within religious studies. May be repeated for credit when topics vary. Prerequisite(s): None.

RELS 5300. Introduction to Religious Studies. 3 Credit Hours.

Examine religion as an aspect of culture in a postmodern, diversified, global community. Evaluate the history and concepts used in the academic study of religion, and the major religious traditions of the world. Prerequisite(s): None.

RELS 5304. Sociology of Religion. 3 Credit Hours.

Examine religion and religious phenomena from the perspectives, theories, and methods of sociology. Evaluate the major works of classical theorists such as Durkheim, Weber, and Marx, and recent theorists such as Berger and Stark.

RELS 5310. Anthropology of Religion. 3 Credit Hours.

Apply anthropology to religion through a study of ethnographies, and literature pertaining to the study of religious phenomena. Explore myth and ritual, altered states, healing and bewitching, and the roles of religious practitioners. This course is cross-listed with ANTH 5310, and only one may be taken for credit.

RELS 5312. Psychology of Religion. 3 Credit Hours.

Examine major issues and theories in the psychological approach to the study of religious phenomena. Analyze the literature of theorists, the contributions of neuroscience, evolutionary psychology, consciousness research, and regressive hypnotherapy in the study of religion.

RELS 5315. Philosophy of Religion. 3 Credit Hours.

Examine religious phenomena, and concepts of God, miracles, claims of religion, the problem of evil, and religious ethics. Study and evaluate the relationship of religion and philosophy, and the place of philosophy within the religious experience.

RELS 5320. Religious Terrorism. 3 Credit Hours.

Examines the religious motivations, support, and tactics behind the phenomena of domestic and foreign terrorism. Analyze case studies and histories of specific terrorist organizations, justifications for violence, and terrorist targets. Maybe crosslisted with HLS 5320. Only one may be taken for credit.

RELS 5329. Church and State. 3 Credit Hours.

Explores the interaction of religion and political life in the US, beginning with the First Great Awakening and early life under the new Constitution, through the Second Great Awakening and up to the present day. Readings will be primary sources in American religious and political thought.

RELS 5355. Religion and Politics. 3 Credit Hours.

Provides an overview of the influence of religion on politics in the US. Examines the relationship between religion and political mobilization, interest group group politics, public opinion, race and ethnicity, foreign policy, and elections.

RELS 5389. Special Topics in Religion. 3 Credit Hours.

Examine selected topics within religious studies. Students may enroll for additional credit hours when topics vary.

Sociology Courses

SOCI 1301. Introduction to Sociology. 3 Credit Hours.

(080) The scientific study of human society, including ways in which groups, social institutions, and individuals affect each other. Causes of social stability and social change are explored through the application of various theoretical perspectives, key concepts, and related research methods of sociology. Analysis of social issues in their institutional context may include topics such as social stratification, gender, race/ethnicity, and deviance.

SOCI 1306. Social Problems. 3 Credit Hours.

(080) Application of sociological principles and theoretical perspectives to major social problems in contemporary society such as inequality, crime and violence, substance abuse, environmental issues, deviance, or family problems.

SOCI 2301. Marriage & the Family. 3 Credit Hours.

(080) Sociological and theoretical analysis of the structures and functions of the family, the varied cultural patterns of the American family, and the relationships that exist among the individuals within the family, as well as the relationships that exist between the family and other institutions in society.

SOCI 2306. Human Sexuality. 3 Credit Hours.

(080) This course will provide an overview of the broad field of human sexuality. Topics will be covered from various perspectives – biological, sociological, anthropological, etc., but will focus primarily on the psychological perspective. The goal is for each student to learn factual, scientifically-based information that will provoke thought and contribute to his/her own decision-making on sexual issues outside of the classroom. (Cross-listed as PSYC 2306).

SOCI 2319. Minority Studies. 3 Credit Hours.

(040) (080) This course studies minority-majority group relations, addressing their historical, cultural, social, economic, and institutional development in the United States. Both sociological and social psychological levels of analysis will be employed to discuss issues including experiences of minority groups within the context of their cultural heritage and tradition, as well as that of the dominant culture. Core concepts to be examined include (but are not limited to) social inequality, dominance/subordination, prejudice, and discrimination. Particular minority groups discussed may include those based on poverty, race/ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation, age, disability, or religion.

SOCI 2326. Social Psychology. 3 Credit Hours.

(080) Study of individual behavior within the social environment. May include topics such as the socio-psychological process, attitude formation and change, interpersonal relations, and group processe.

SOCI 2336. Criminology. 3 Credit Hours.

(080) The course surveys various theories of crime, with an emphasis on understanding the social causes of criminal behavior. The techniques for measuring crime as a social phenomenon and the characteristics of criminals are examined. This course addresses crime types (such as consensual or white-collar crimes), the criminal justice system, and other social responses to crime.

SOCI 2340. Drug Use & Abuse. 3 Credit Hours.

(080) Study of the use and abuse of drugs in today's society. Emphasizes the physiological, sociological, and psychological factors.

SOCI 3301. Sociology of the Family. 3 Credit Hours.

Study the family as a social institution with emphasis on formation, functions, maintenance, child rearing, and family disorganization.

SOCI 3303. Race and Ethnicity. 3 Credit Hours.

Analyze relationships between dominant groups and minority groups that make up American society. Examine theories of race relations and prejudice, the meaning of racial differences, group conflict, and modes of accommodation.

SOCI 3304. Sociological Theory. 3 Credit Hours.

(WI) Examine the major schools of sociological thought, including perspectives from both classic and contemporary sociological theory.

SOCI 3305. Criminology. 3 Credit Hours.

Examine theories of criminology and significant research on causes, extent, cost and ecology of crime, police, criminal, and juvenile courts, and prisons and reformatories. Special emphasis on prevention and rehabilitation. Credit for both CRIJ 3305 and SOCI 3305 will not be awarded.

SOCI 3308. Deviant Behavior. 3 Credit Hours.

Examine factors and conditions leading to behaviors that violate and deviate from fundamental social values. Analyze the relationship of personal and social maladjustment in relation to the various theories of deviant behavior.

SOCI 3310. Sociology of Aging. 3 Credit Hours.

Study the reciprocal relationship between society and those considered aged by society, utilizing concepts and theoretical frameworks applicable to that population group. Explore the social forces that impinge on the aging process, including socially constructed images of the aged, and patterns of inequality of gender, race, and economics.

SOCI 3312. Environmental Sociology. 3 Credit Hours.

(WI) Examine relationships and interactions between society and the environment. Explore how the natural world influences the way societies are organized, with special emphasis on human communities as part of natural ecosystems. Prerequisite(s): None.

SOCI 3315. Methods of Sociological Research. 3 Credit Hours.

(WI) Learn the principles and methods of social research, including research design, methods of observation, questionnaires, and interviews. Apply qualitative and quantitative techniques of inference, analysis, and research report writing, to gain practical experience in limited research studies.

SOCI 3340. Media and Society. 3 Credit Hours.

Examine the interactions of culture and the media with a focus on representations of race, class, gender, and sexuality. Evaluate contemporary mass media to explore the unique relationship between media content, the industry that creates it, and audiences whose interpretations and demands constitute its market.

SOCI 4301. The Military Family. 3 Credit Hours.

Examine the relationship between the work organization and the family in the armed forces of the United States. Using a sociological perspective, analyze and discuss contemporary issues, situations, problems, and policies relevant to military families.

SOCI 4303. Social Inequalities. 3 Credit Hours.

Examine social inequality and categories of difference from a sociological perspective. Analyze social difference and stratification on the basis of race/ethnicity, class, gender, religion, and sexuality by examining how these categories are constructed, institutionalized, and experienced. Special emphasis on economic and labor-based inequality through the lens of contemporary global processes.

SOCI 4304. Sociology of Religion. 3 Credit Hours.

Examine the principles of religion, religious belief, and practice as a sociological concept. Special emphasis on the relationship of religion to the progress and stability of the social order.

SOCI 4305. Sociological Theory. 3 Credit Hours.

(WI) Examine the major schools of sociological thought, including perspectives from both classic and contemporary sociological theory.

SOCI 4310. Sociology of the Body. 3 Credit Hours.

Study the body as the container and expression of the self, as the object of social control, and the body as it relates to race, gender, sex, class, age, ability, sexuality, and transgender identities.

SOCI 4311. Sociology of Sexuality. 3 Credit Hours.

Study how sexuality is perceived, defined, and experienced in the context of society. Analyze the influence of sexuality on our lives, reflected in social norms, attitudes and beliefs, through public and private policies and practices, and social institutions.

SOCI 4312. Gender in Society. 3 Credit Hours.

Examine socialization to sex roles, and the male/female differences in family, work, and political behavior. Special Emphasis on male/female inequality, effects of gender in education and religion, and current changes in sex role definitions.

SOCI 4313. Development and Social Change. 3 Credit Hours.

Explore social processes and social problems as they are contained in the highly interdependent world system. Examine social change and development through historical, comparative, and critical perspectives. Analyze the problem of how and why societies and cultures around the world change, and evaluate whether those changes promote justice, equity, democracy, and development of human potential.

SOCI 4315. Social Science Statistics. 3 Credit Hours.

Apply the elementary forms of statistical processes, including central tendency, variation, the normal curve and Z scores, analysis of variance, regression analysis, and correlations to social science data. Explore the role of statistics in social work, sociology, criminal justice, political science, and gerontology. SPSS is utilized for data analysis.

SOCI 4316. Methods of Sociological Research. 3 Credit Hours.

(WI) Learn the principles and methods of social research, including research design, methods of observation, questionnaires, and interviews. Apply qualitative and quantitative techniques of inference, analysis, and research report writing, to gain practical experience in limited research studies.

SOCI 4317. Qualitative Research Methods. 3 Credit Hours.

Introduces methodological approaches corresponding to qualitative research methods, with special emphases on interviewing, observation techniques, ethnographic field-based methods, and content analysis. Prerequisite/Corequisite: SOCI 3315 or CRIJ 4316.

SOCI 4320. Social Psychology and Interaction. 3 Credit Hours.

Explore symbolic interactionism, and the influence of society, groups, culture, and other persons on the attitudes, behavior, and experiences of the individual. Prerequisite(s): None.

SOCI 4388. Sociology Problems. 1-6 Credit Hours.

Engage in independent reading, research and discussion on selected topics in sociology. Entry into this course will be arranged with the sociology counselor.

SOCI 4389. Special Topics in Sociology. 1-3 Credit Hours.

Engage in independent reading, research, discussion, and paper writing under personal direction of instructor. May be taken more than once for credit if topics vary. Prerequisite(s): May be taken more than once for credit if topics vary.

SOCI 5304. Sociology of Religion. 3 Credit Hours.

An critical examination of religions and religious phenomena from the perspectives, theories, and methods of sociology. Reviews the major works of classical theorists such as Durkheim, Weber, and Marx, and recent theorists such as Berger and Stark.

SOCI 5305. Theoretical Sociology. 3 Credit Hours.

Study the historical development of sociological theory by examining the major works of classical, contemporary, postmodern and modern social theorists.

SOCI 5388. Sociology Problems. 3 Credit Hours.

Engage in independent reading, research, and discussion on selected topics in sociology, under the supervision of an instructor. May be repeated as topic varies for up to six hours of credit.

SOCI 5389. Special Topics in Sociology. 3 Credit Hours.

Explore selected topics within sociology. May be repeated as topics vary.